Side-by-Side Comparison

Although our review pages are very informational and helpful, there is nothing more concrete than a side-by-side comparisons.
Instead of using digital versions of the mosaics, we decided to take high resolution digital pictures of each printed mosaic; in this way the final results are more easily understood and revealed. Each printed mosaic was mounted on a black foam board.

Below you will find three views of each mosaic that was reviewed:
1) A distance view to see the overall target source clarity
2) A close up sectional view to see the cells and reveal how each mosaic is created
3) A super close up for detail/clarity and resolution (dpi)

Distance Views: Although all of the mosaics look similar at first glance, it is soon becomes clear that one of these maintains more true colors and vividness compared to the other three.

Picture Mosaics full shot
Picture Mosaics (above): Using only a grid of 51 by 51 cells (2601 total cells), this mosaic had the clarity and vividness that make this mosaic stand out from a distance. None of the orginal colors were muted or colorized. The overall clarity of the source image was remarkable. Also, this was the only mosaic printed with a border (white) in addition to the print area to allow for easy framing.
Big Mosaics full shot
Big Mosiacs (above): Using a grid of 96 by 80 cells (7680 total cells) this mosaic had ultra small cell photos, the smallest we have ever seen! Source clarity from a distance was good, however since the mosaic had so many cells, the cells were too tiny to see. The mosaic was printed on a high gloss paper which produced so much glare that we had trouble viewing, and photographing, the mosaic. The cells on the outside edge of the print were cut in half (borderless), and made framing a challenge.
Design A Mosaic full shot
Design A Mosaic (above): Using a grid of 27 x 28 cells (756 total cells), this mosaic was very faded and lacked that wow factor. It was clear, even from a distance, that the target source image was superimposed giving the mosaic a fake appearance. The source image and it's colors were so superimposed that the cells became difficult to identify since they were so faded.
Mosaically full shot
Mosaically (above): Using a grid of 52 by 53 cells (2756 total cells), this mosaic looked good from a distance and had good color/contrast attributes. Something we quickly noticed was the loud permanent sticker of the company logo in the lower right hand corner, which we assumed to be advertising. It was also clear that quite a bit of colorization/superimposing was used, which detracted from the overall mosaic effect.

 

Close Up Views: In this view, we positioned our camera about 6 inches from the mosaic to reveal a close section view of each. We also placed a US nickel to help with perspective and sizing on different monitors. The nickels are the same size in each image for easy comparisons. We found some interesting (and somewhat undesired) techniques used in the creation of each mosaic.

Picture Mosaic close up
Thumbs Up! Picture Mosaics (above): A closer look reveals large vivid cell photos, with minimal to no colorization. There is no source superimposing and the true colors from each photo are used to create the target source image. This mosaic has the wow factor!
Big Mosaics close up
Thumbs Down. Big Mosaics (above): A closer look reveals that the cell photos are very tiny and hard to see. The cell photos are 3x to 5x smaller than the other mosaics we reviewed. Additionally, we quickly noticed that they unfortunately decided to crop all of our photos to squares. There was also evidence of strong colorization of the cell photos. Lastly we noted that duplicates were repeated in very close proximity to one another.
Design A Mosaic close up
Thumbs Down. Design A Mosaic (above): A closer look reveals that the cells, although large, have little impact on the creation of the target source image. The company has chosen to strongly superimpose the source image on top of the cells. In the above photo, you can see the ultra dark blue color and stripes from my nephew's shirt superimposed on the source. This strong superimposition makes the cell photos faded and difficult to see.
Mosaically close up
Thumbs Down. Mosaically (above): A closer look reveals average size cells that attempt to create the target source, however the source has been strongly superimposed. In the above photo, you can seem the ultra dark blue color and stripes from my nephew's shirt superimposed on the source. This strong superimposition makes the cell photos faded and difficult to see.

 

Super Close Up Views: In the views below, we use a 10x Loreo Lubot (a photographer magnification lens) to explore the actual print resolution (dpi) of each mosaic. The greater the dpi (dots per inch), the clearer and sharper each cell photo can be.  The results are pretty clear (no pun intended).

10x Loreo Lubot
Above: Our 10x Loreo Lubot to study the print reolstuion (dpi) of each mosaic.
Picture Mosaics super close up
Thumbs Up! Picture Mosaics (above) at 10x magnification. The cell photos are very clear, minimal ink dots can be seen at this magnification. Cell photos are non-faded and maintain the orginal color.
Big Mosaics super close up
Thumbs Down. Big Mosaics (above) at 10x magnification. Ink dots are visible and graininess results. The small cells further degrades clarity.
Design A Mosaic super close up
Thumbs Down. Design A Mosaic (above) at 10x magnification. The cells are large, however they are very faded (due to colorization and target source superimposition); ink dots/pixelization can be seen.
Mosaically super close up
Thumbs Down. Mosaically (above) at 10x magnification. Clarity and resolution is good; unfortunately cell photos are slightly faded due to colorization.